Word of the Day

Word of the Day

Definition : a person who idolizes Shakespeare Did You Know? George Bernard Shaw once described a William Shakespeare play as "stagy trash." Another time, Shaw said he'd like to dig Shakespeare from the grave and throw stones at him. Shaw could be equally scathing toward Shakespeare's adoring fans. He called them "foolish Bardolaters," wrote of "Bardolatrous" ignoramuses, and called blind Shakespeare worship "Bardolatry." Oddly enough, Shaw didn't despise Shakespeare or his work (on the contrary, he was, by his own admission, an admirer), but he disdained those who placed the man beyond reproach. The word bardolater, which Shaw coined by blending Shakespeare's epithet—"the Bard"—with an affix that calls to mind idolater, has stuck with us to this day, though it has lost some of its original critical sting.

Read More >
Word of the Day

Word of the Day

Definition 1: to act as a detective: search for information 2: to search for and discover Did You Know? "They were the footprints of a gigantic hound!" Those canine tracks in Arthur Conan Doyle's The Hound of the Baskervilles set the great Sherlock Holmes sleuthing on the trail of a murderer. It was a case of art imitating etymology. When Middle English speakers first borrowed sleuth from Old Norse, the term referred to "the track of an animal or person." In Scotland, sleuthhound referred to a bloodhound used to hunt game or track down fugitives from justice. In 19th-century U.S. English, sleuthhound became an epithet for a detective and was soon shortened to sleuth. From there, it was only a short leap to turning sleuth into a verb describing what a sleuth does.   mettlesome

Read More >
TOP 10 NIGERIAN BOOKS THAT REMINDS YOU OF CHILDHOOD THAT WILL MAKE YOU LAUGH

TOP 10 NIGERIAN BOOKS THAT REMINDS YOU OF CHILDHOOD THAT WILL MAKE YOU LAUGH

TOP 10 NIGERIAN BOOKS THAT REMINDS YOU OF CHILDHOOD THAT WILL MAKE YOU LAUGH If you were one of those born in the 80s and 90s, books were your everything, your escape from boredom, your companion. It was like a competition. You wanted to be among those who had read certain books and brag about it. As we grow older, it’s easy to forget how important it is to keep reading. We tend to forget how our lives were positively affected by reading. We seem to have lost that excitement and pleasure we derived from reading. Since the arrival of mobile and smart phones, reading has begun fading from our culture and children are concentrating more on keeping up with the trends on social media. Here are some memorable Nigerian literature books that kept 90s children company 1. The gods are not to blame by Ola Rotimi The novel is set in an indeterminate period of a Yoruba kingdom. It is dramatic tale of a man named Odewale who was born with a destiny he tried to run away from.   2. Eze goes to school by Onuora Nzekwu and Michael CrowderIt was one of the popular literatures back in the day. It portrays the life of a typical Nigerian community and inspiring determination in the face of chal

Read More >
Word of the Day

Word of the Day

Definition 1 : unruly or disorderly: wild 2 : marked by shyness and lack of social graces Did You Know? In French, farouche can mean "wild" or "shy," just as it does in English. It is an alteration of the Old French word forasche, which derives via Late Latin forasticus ("living outside") from Latin foras, meaning "outdoors." In its earliest English uses, in the middle of the 18th century, farouche was used to describe someone who was awkward in social situations, perhaps as one who has lived apart from groups of people. The word can also mean "disorderly," as in "farouche ruffians out to cause trouble."

Read More >
word of the Day

word of the Day

Did You Know? Nomothetic is often contrasted with idiographic, a word meaning "relating to or dealing with something concrete, individual, or unique." Where idiographic points to the specific and unique, nomothetic points to the general and consistent. The immediate Greek parent of nomothetic is a word meaning "of legislation"; the word has its roots in nomos, meaning "law," and -thetēs, meaning "one who establishes." Nomos has played a part in the histories of words as varied as metronome, autonomous, and Deuteronomy. The English contributions of -thetēs are meager, but -thetēs itself comes from tithenai, meaning "to put," and tithenai is the ancestor of many common words ending in -thesis—hypothesis, parenthesis, prosthesis, synthesis, and thesis itself—as well as theme, epithet, and apothecary. Definition relating to, involving, or dealing with abstract, general, or universal statements or laws Follow @istoryng and turn on our post notification for your daily dose of enlightenment, interactive sessions, writing prompt, fun, engagement, books and our African stories[ #istoryng Home for readers and writers].

Read More >
“AN AFRICAN THUNDERSTORM” 

“AN AFRICAN THUNDERSTORM” 

Who remembered "AN AFRICAN THUNDERSTORM''  by David Rubadiri. There is a lot of inspiration in this poem and that is what I love about it, It's really captivating, how the poem draws the reader's attention to the setting. I could picture the events of the chaos and uproar caused by this storm. This poem reflects how typical African villages are when rain is coming. From the west Clouds come hurrying with the wind Turning sharply Here and there Like a plague of locusts Whirling, Tossing up things on its tail Like a madman chasing nothing. Pregnant clouds Ride stately on its back, Gathering to perch on hills Like sinister dark wings; The wind whistles by And trees bend to let it pass. In the village Screams of delighted children, Toss and turn In the din of the whirling wind, Women, Babies clinging on their backs Dart about In and out Madly; The wind whistles by Whilst trees bend to let it pass. Clothes wave like tattered flags Flying off To expose dangling breasts As jagged blinding flashes Rumble, tremble and crack Amidst the smell of fired smoke And the pelting march of the storm.   David Rubadiri.

Read More >
HAPPY WORLD POETRY DAY

HAPPY WORLD POETRY DAY

Let us paint the world with our stories, let our pen be our instrument that would bring forth the voice of reawakening of our hidden treasures that lies in the stories that was left untold.

Read More >
Every Writer Knows These 18 Truths

Every Writer Knows These 18 Truths

  So many times, people just see the good parts of writing or writers that are projected on social media or magazines and what have you. Writing is serious business, and writers face their own share of how unpleasant or pleasant  (as the case may be) it can get. Everything is not always as it seems, there’s more behind-the-scenes to those great books and their creators than you can imagine. If you’re a writer, you’ll no doubt find these things to be true and relatable. Times will come when you have to be your own hype man. The people closest to you may not take you seriously. “Go look for a proper job and stop carrying book up and down.” Writing can be such hard work. You’ll face rejection from publishers. Publishing a book is not easy. Your ‘imaginary friends’ (a.k.a writer’s block) will desert you more often than you’d like. Your real friends may not grasp your constant need for solitude. Laziness/procrastination is your greatest threat to greatness. People look at you with admiration, but what they don’t know is the last time you wrote (should we tell them?). You read some books and self-doubt stealthily creeps in. All your weeks/months of

Read More >
7 Habits for Highly Effective Writing

7 Habits for Highly Effective Writing

How many half-hearted drafts do you have here and there? When last did you make a conscious effort to write? Why do you find it easier scrolling through Instagram reading the works of others yet you haven’t written anything in days, if not months? You know you have the talent; everyone marvels at how well you write when you write, masterpieces have been birthed in your head… and it goes on… Long story short, you need new habits! Positive ones of course. Having dreams of being a successful writer like Chimamanda Adichie, Maya Angelou, Wole Soyinka, etc, isn’t far-fetched or impossible, but there are certain habits to inculcate into your life, if not, well your dreams will just remain that – dreams. Success comes with a prize, can you pay it? If you’re determined enough, over time these positive habits will become part of you. 1. Challenge: you can’t grow if you don’t try new things or challenge the status quo. Push yourself to greatness. If you’ve been writing five lines a day, why not try ten tomorrow? These baby steps will give way for giant strides consequently. 2. Focus: starve your distractions and you’ll see that you’ll achieve more. Keep your eyes (and pen or cursor) on the

Read More >
2019 AFRICAN WRITERS AWARD OPENS FOR SUBMISSION

2019 AFRICAN WRITERS AWARD OPENS FOR SUBMISSION

The Africa Writers Development Trust (AWDT) is accepting submissions for the 2019 African Writers Award on the theme “Cultural stereotypes in African Literature: Rewriting the narrative for the 21st Century Reader”.  They are accepting submissions in the following categories: Flash Fiction: Max 300 words Short Stories: 2,500 – 5,000 words Poetry: Max 30 lines Children’s stories: Max 1,500 with illustrations (optional). Four writers of African descent will win prestigious awards. The awards will be presented at the 2019 African Writers Conference Dinner and Awards Night scheduled to hold in September this year. The venue, date and time will be communicated at a later date. Please consider the following: Although the author retains full copyright, AWDT reserves the right to use the winning stories for promotional purposes only. This may include publishing it in the Writers Space Africa monthly magazine. The Longlist will be announced in July while the shortlist will be announced early August. The winners will be awarded at the award ceremony in Nairobi, Kenya. Submissions must be in English and must never have been published on any platform. All entries must be

Read More >