Word of the Day

Word of the Day

Definition : a person who idolizes Shakespeare Did You Know? George Bernard Shaw once described a William Shakespeare play as "stagy trash." Another time, Shaw said he'd like to dig Shakespeare from the grave and throw stones at him. Shaw could be equally scathing toward Shakespeare's adoring fans. He called them "foolish Bardolaters," wrote of "Bardolatrous" ignoramuses, and called blind Shakespeare worship "Bardolatry." Oddly enough, Shaw didn't despise Shakespeare or his work (on the contrary, he was, by his own admission, an admirer), but he disdained those who placed the man beyond reproach. The word bardolater, which Shaw coined by blending Shakespeare's epithet—"the Bard"—with an affix that calls to mind idolater, has stuck with us to this day, though it has lost some of its original critical sting.

Read More >
TOP 10 NIGERIAN BOOKS THAT REMINDS YOU OF CHILDHOOD THAT WILL MAKE YOU LAUGH

TOP 10 NIGERIAN BOOKS THAT REMINDS YOU OF CHILDHOOD THAT WILL MAKE YOU LAUGH

TOP 10 NIGERIAN BOOKS THAT REMINDS YOU OF CHILDHOOD THAT WILL MAKE YOU LAUGH If you were one of those born in the 80s and 90s, books were your everything, your escape from boredom, your companion. It was like a competition. You wanted to be among those who had read certain books and brag about it. As we grow older, it’s easy to forget how important it is to keep reading. We tend to forget how our lives were positively affected by reading. We seem to have lost that excitement and pleasure we derived from reading. Since the arrival of mobile and smart phones, reading has begun fading from our culture and children are concentrating more on keeping up with the trends on social media. Here are some memorable Nigerian literature books that kept 90s children company 1. The gods are not to blame by Ola Rotimi The novel is set in an indeterminate period of a Yoruba kingdom. It is dramatic tale of a man named Odewale who was born with a destiny he tried to run away from.   2. Eze goes to school by Onuora Nzekwu and Michael CrowderIt was one of the popular literatures back in the day. It portrays the life of a typical Nigerian community and inspiring determination in the face of chal

Read More >
Word of the Day

Word of the Day

Definition 1 : unruly or disorderly: wild 2 : marked by shyness and lack of social graces Did You Know? In French, farouche can mean "wild" or "shy," just as it does in English. It is an alteration of the Old French word forasche, which derives via Late Latin forasticus ("living outside") from Latin foras, meaning "outdoors." In its earliest English uses, in the middle of the 18th century, farouche was used to describe someone who was awkward in social situations, perhaps as one who has lived apart from groups of people. The word can also mean "disorderly," as in "farouche ruffians out to cause trouble."

Read More >
word of the Day

word of the Day

Did You Know? Nomothetic is often contrasted with idiographic, a word meaning "relating to or dealing with something concrete, individual, or unique." Where idiographic points to the specific and unique, nomothetic points to the general and consistent. The immediate Greek parent of nomothetic is a word meaning "of legislation"; the word has its roots in nomos, meaning "law," and -thetēs, meaning "one who establishes." Nomos has played a part in the histories of words as varied as metronome, autonomous, and Deuteronomy. The English contributions of -thetēs are meager, but -thetēs itself comes from tithenai, meaning "to put," and tithenai is the ancestor of many common words ending in -thesis—hypothesis, parenthesis, prosthesis, synthesis, and thesis itself—as well as theme, epithet, and apothecary. Definition relating to, involving, or dealing with abstract, general, or universal statements or laws Follow @istoryng and turn on our post notification for your daily dose of enlightenment, interactive sessions, writing prompt, fun, engagement, books and our African stories[ #istoryng Home for readers and writers].

Read More >
“AN AFRICAN THUNDERSTORM” 

“AN AFRICAN THUNDERSTORM” 

Who remembered "AN AFRICAN THUNDERSTORM''  by David Rubadiri. There is a lot of inspiration in this poem and that is what I love about it, It's really captivating, how the poem draws the reader's attention to the setting. I could picture the events of the chaos and uproar caused by this storm. This poem reflects how typical African villages are when rain is coming. From the west Clouds come hurrying with the wind Turning sharply Here and there Like a plague of locusts Whirling, Tossing up things on its tail Like a madman chasing nothing. Pregnant clouds Ride stately on its back, Gathering to perch on hills Like sinister dark wings; The wind whistles by And trees bend to let it pass. In the village Screams of delighted children, Toss and turn In the din of the whirling wind, Women, Babies clinging on their backs Dart about In and out Madly; The wind whistles by Whilst trees bend to let it pass. Clothes wave like tattered flags Flying off To expose dangling breasts As jagged blinding flashes Rumble, tremble and crack Amidst the smell of fired smoke And the pelting march of the storm.   David Rubadiri.

Read More >
Discover My Top Writing Tips for Beginners and Get Better at Writing

Discover My Top Writing Tips for Beginners and Get Better at Writing

Have you ever dreamed of becoming a writer? Or ever fancied seeing your name printed in golden letters on the cover of a bestselling book? Well, if you just screamed a roaring ‘hell yes' at the top of your lungs, chances are you're meant to be a writer. You are meant to help change the world and inspire people’s lives through the power of your words. “But how do I begin? I have no ideas.” “I have ideas but I don't know how to put them on paper.” Worry not, I have a plan for you. Start reading and mimic the voice Write catchy titles Write for yourself Research and understand your audience Study ways to become a great storyteller Make your readers feel something Explore the Internet Be consistent Believe in yourself Write to throw the paper away These are my hand-picked top 10 writing tips for beginners to help you blossom into a top-notch writer. So explore each deeper, read them, apply them, and go get writing. 1. Read like a maniac As a writer, words are your fuel; and what better way to master words than reading itself. If you want to write, you need to read — and read, and read, and read! Read everything you can get your hands

Read More >
BROKEN OR NOT episode 4

BROKEN OR NOT episode 4

https://istory.com.ng/broken-or-not-episode-4/EPISODE 4 *OMOLOLU*Ijeoma stared at me as she stood behind her ‘lover’ and stuttered over some inaudible words.“Err…Tiwa! Ah…” She struggled with words as she approached Tiwa. Tiwa dashed behind me and Ijeoma stepped back. “I…I…I…am really…err…”I saved her the drama. “Is my daughter safe here, Ijeoma?” I asked, staring at her ‘lover’.She nodded as she blinked. “Au…Austin is…is”Spare me the story.” I replied as I placed the phone in Tiwa’shand. “You can always call me,” I said and pecked her forehead. Tiwa smiled faintly. “When would you come back for me?” she asked.“Soon. I’ll end all these soon.” I promised as we hugged. “Take care of my daughter, she is still your daughter if you still remember.” I said sternly and turned to walk away.“Omololu.”I froze in my track as Ijeoma called my name like the first time. I could feel my heart beat racing fast as her footsteps drew closer. I blinked not knowing if I should turn in her direction. My heart still did beat for her. I closed my eyes as I felt her hand run through my chest.“Omololu, please.” She said quietly. I blinked and took her hands away carefully and turned towards her. Her eyes

Read More >
BROKEN OR NOT ☆episode 03☆

BROKEN OR NOT ☆episode 03☆

https://istory.com.ng/broken-or-not-%e2%98%86episode-03%e2%98%86/ ☆☆EPISODE 03 Tiwa kept her eyes shut as she felt a dark movement over her face. She blinked involuntarily giving herself away in the process. “She is alive.” A female voice said. Tiwa’s eyes flew open as she jumped up from the bench and looked at the crowd that surrounded her. Left or right? She contemplated within herself, unsure of what direction to take. It didn’t matter that there was a man with a Bible in his hand and the women with scarves covering their hair. No one could be trusted!“Grab her, don’t let her run.” The man with the Bible ordered. Tiwa tried to leap across the bench but crashed onto the floor hard. She let out a loud cry and they all rushed to help her up. “Take her into the church.” The man ordered and Tiwa was carried into the church by two men as she cried softly. *OMOLOLU*I watched as Mom drank her water slowly and took deep breaths. I wished I could do more for her, but I had caused her more pain by saying I would marry Olivia. She had never liked Olivia.*****“Mom, meet Olivia. She is my friend from Lagos.” I had said when Olivia came to Ibadan to visit us. Mom took in her appearanc

Read More >
10 Writing Resolutions You Can Fulfill Today

10 Writing Resolutions You Can Fulfill Today

Sometimes even the most well-intentioned writing resolutions can end up being whimsical, erratic, and just plain unrealistic. But when you focus on goals that are slightly more achievable, you’re not only more likely to pull them off, but you’ll also feel much better about yourself come deadline time. Following are ten writing resolutions you can start fulfilling right now. 1. You Can Write Every Day Or at least on a regular basis. Plan a reasonable writing schedule and stick with it. Perhaps you’ll write for two hours every day, as I do, or perhaps you’ll only be able to save twenty minutes from the general frenzy of life. Whatever the amount of time, make up your mind to stick with it relentlessly. 2. You Can Finish That First Draft Let this be the year you type “The End” on that story (or stories) you’ve been tinkering with. Unfinished stories are unread stories, and unread stories are unpublished stories. Start building the habit of finishing every story you start. 3. You Can Study the Craft/Read More Invest in some worthy books on the craft, subscribe to writing magazines, or sign up for writing workshops either online or at a con

Read More >
CULTURE: STUCK IN A DREAM.

CULTURE: STUCK IN A DREAM.

CULTURE: STUCK IN A DREAM.   Did you ever stare at a face carved in stone and within a split second of magical awe, realize that this man made soul is a correct depiction of the statical form of a man, stuck in a dream?   Reliving a life planted in his mind by a time when influenced by pride in a worthy home, his maker gave essence to void. A void which once was him.   Clinging now to the euphoria and wealth in his creator's smile, as he knelt before an oversized pebble, on that day, beside a glory filled hut. Surrounded by gorse and rich trees, dancing to the story filled songs, on lips shaped like the half-moon’s smile.   Do you ever stare at this face, and wish to be stuck in his dream? Or ask, "at what point did growth go wrong?"   Have we cast back into the night, Those shadows that gave depth to our plain, garish selves? Have we drowned in foreign light, the gentle, feeble glow, that was the muse in the darkest times   Wishing now to be sucked into our stone friend's sleep, Are we, ourselves, stuck in a dream? A tap on the shoulder, or a loud call away

Read More >