Word of the Day

Word of the Day

LYCATHROPY noun lye-KAN-thruh-pee Definition: 1 : a delusion that one has become a wolf 2 : the assumption of the form and characteristics of a wolf held to be possible by witchcraft or magic Did You Know? If you happen to be afflicted with lycanthropy, the full moon is apt to cause you an inordinate amount of distress. Lycanthropy can refer to either the delusional idea that one is a wolf or to the werewolf transformations that have been the stuff of superstitions for centuries. In some cultures, similar myths involve human transformation into other equally feared animals: hyenas and leopards in Africa, for example, and tigers in Asia. The word lycanthropy itself, however, comes from the Greek words lykos, meaning "wolf," and anthrōpos, meaning "human being." Werewolf myths are usually associated with the phases of the moon; the animal nature of the werewolf (or lycanthrope) is typically thought to take over when the moon is full.

Read More >
Word of the Day

Word of the Day

FANTOD noun FAN-tahd Definition 1 plural fantods a : a state of irritability and tension b : fidgets 2 : an emotional outburst : fit Did You Know? "You have got strong symptoms of the fantods; your skin is so tight you can't shut your eyes without opening your mouth." Thus, American author Charles Frederick Briggs provides us with an early recorded use of fantods in 1839. Mark Twain used the word to refer to uneasiness or restlessness as shown by nervous movements—also known as the fidgets—in Huckleberry Finn: "They was all nice pictures, I reckon, but I didn't somehow seem to take to them, because … they always give me the fantods." David Foster Wallace later used "the howling fantods," a favorite phrase of his mother, in Infinite Jest. The exact origin of fantod remains a mystery, but it may have arisen from English dialectal fantigue—a word (once used by Charles Dickens) that refers to a state of great tension or excitement and may be a blend of fantastic and fatigue.  

Read More >
Word of the Day

Word of the Day

Definition : a person who idolizes Shakespeare Did You Know? George Bernard Shaw once described a William Shakespeare play as "stagy trash." Another time, Shaw said he'd like to dig Shakespeare from the grave and throw stones at him. Shaw could be equally scathing toward Shakespeare's adoring fans. He called them "foolish Bardolaters," wrote of "Bardolatrous" ignoramuses, and called blind Shakespeare worship "Bardolatry." Oddly enough, Shaw didn't despise Shakespeare or his work (on the contrary, he was, by his own admission, an admirer), but he disdained those who placed the man beyond reproach. The word bardolater, which Shaw coined by blending Shakespeare's epithet—"the Bard"—with an affix that calls to mind idolater, has stuck with us to this day, though it has lost some of its original critical sting.

Read More >
Word of the Day

Word of the Day

Definition 1: to act as a detective: search for information 2: to search for and discover Did You Know? "They were the footprints of a gigantic hound!" Those canine tracks in Arthur Conan Doyle's The Hound of the Baskervilles set the great Sherlock Holmes sleuthing on the trail of a murderer. It was a case of art imitating etymology. When Middle English speakers first borrowed sleuth from Old Norse, the term referred to "the track of an animal or person." In Scotland, sleuthhound referred to a bloodhound used to hunt game or track down fugitives from justice. In 19th-century U.S. English, sleuthhound became an epithet for a detective and was soon shortened to sleuth. From there, it was only a short leap to turning sleuth into a verb describing what a sleuth does.   mettlesome

Read More >
Word of the Day

Word of the Day

Definition 1 : unruly or disorderly: wild 2 : marked by shyness and lack of social graces Did You Know? In French, farouche can mean "wild" or "shy," just as it does in English. It is an alteration of the Old French word forasche, which derives via Late Latin forasticus ("living outside") from Latin foras, meaning "outdoors." In its earliest English uses, in the middle of the 18th century, farouche was used to describe someone who was awkward in social situations, perhaps as one who has lived apart from groups of people. The word can also mean "disorderly," as in "farouche ruffians out to cause trouble."

Read More >
word of the Day

word of the Day

Did You Know? Nomothetic is often contrasted with idiographic, a word meaning "relating to or dealing with something concrete, individual, or unique." Where idiographic points to the specific and unique, nomothetic points to the general and consistent. The immediate Greek parent of nomothetic is a word meaning "of legislation"; the word has its roots in nomos, meaning "law," and -thetēs, meaning "one who establishes." Nomos has played a part in the histories of words as varied as metronome, autonomous, and Deuteronomy. The English contributions of -thetēs are meager, but -thetēs itself comes from tithenai, meaning "to put," and tithenai is the ancestor of many common words ending in -thesis—hypothesis, parenthesis, prosthesis, synthesis, and thesis itself—as well as theme, epithet, and apothecary. Definition relating to, involving, or dealing with abstract, general, or universal statements or laws Follow @istoryng and turn on our post notification for your daily dose of enlightenment, interactive sessions, writing prompt, fun, engagement, books and our African stories[ #istoryng Home for readers and writers].

Read More >

word of the day

Word of the Day:  February 11, 2019   Ratiocination noun: rat-ee-oh-suh-NAY-shun   Definition 1 : the process of exact thinking : reasoning 2: a reasoned train of thought Did You Know? Edgar Allan Poe is said to have called the 1841 story "The Murders in the Rue Morgue" his first "tale of ratiocination." Many today agree with his assessment and consider that Poe classic to be literature's first detective story. Poe didn't actually use ratiocination in "Rue Morgue," but the term does appear three times in its 1842 sequel, "The Mystery of Marie Roget." In "Marie Roget," the author proved his reasoning ability (ratiocination traces to ratio, Latin for "reason" or "computation"). The second tale was based on an actual murder, and as the case unfolded after the publication of Poe's work, it became clear that his fictional detective had done an amazing job of reasoning through the crime.  

Read More >
WIND IN A RAINSTORM

WIND IN A RAINSTORM

WIND IN A RAINSTORM Like the wind, dancing wild In a rainstorm. Honey is alive, When the world drops dead. He once sang to me With a sore throat It WASN'T nice. But I'll pay to hear it again. He'd laugh at me For crying; The world makes me Do that sometimes. He'd laugh at himself For crying; We do that together, Then laugh all night. Like a wind dancing wild In a rainstorm, Honey bought a cake, When we lost a friend. We cried, Laughed, Ate some cake And did it all, All over again. ...........    

Read More >
DEAD MAN

DEAD MAN

Dead man, Stay buried while the seeds grow. You're dead, you needn't become a scarecrow. Do not scare them off, let the birds eat. Eat off the plants as they grow. Dead man, When the birds have eaten to their fill Rise then, destroy what's left of the seeds So, from the abundance of loss, we could have a feast. But Dead man, After this, You mustn't stay confined. Sail down to Heaven and smoke a roll with Marley, down a street in Holy Ville, give a song to Kuti. Tell them how lucky they are to be alive, while the rest of us die on this plane. Then, Dead man, Leave!! Heaven can wait. fly up to hell and tell the Devil a Joke; of how men think him defeated and weaker than most. Go on then and live, Dead man. You're luckier than most of us.   Portrait by  Tomasz Alen Kopera. Go on, Like and comment  Share it  and don't forget  to follow @istoryng on  instagram, facebook and twitter.

Read More >